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giant wwi topographic map enhances study of canadian history for burlington studentsgiant wwi topographic map enhances study of canadian history for burlington studentsgiant wwi topographic map enhances study of canadian history for burlington students -

by:Cailong     2020-11-14
giant wwi topographic map enhances study of canadian history for burlington studentsgiant wwi topographic map enhances study of canadian history for burlington studentsgiant wwi topographic map enhances study of canadian history for burlington students  -  corrugated plastic
This huge teaching tool is packed in a 2-meter-long plastic bellows, folded many times inside, just in time for the anniversary.
Launched this week by a 10 th grade Canadian history student at Robert Bateman High School, 11 m x 8 m (35ft x 26ft)
Topographic maps consume most of the space on multiple floors
Use the former dance studio at the New Street school cafeteria.
The interactive relief map and its accompanying activity backbone borrow from Canada's National Geographic magazine to show the geographical location of the battle of Canadian soldiers and the battlefield of the First World War in Europe where thousands of people died.
Before 100, the students took off their shoes and walked into the Western Line. Postcard-
Battle cards of the size of their hands-with historical photos, battle dates and number of Canadian casualties --
They were asked to find the site on the map, and as they looked around for names, they gradually found themselves gathered in a cluster in Belgium and France.
They stood at the location of the famous battles of vermi Ridge and pashrendale, where a total of more than 26,000 Canadians were killed.
Teacher Sharon Hrysko also asked them to look for less-known combat sites, "but it is also important that Canadians sacrifice their lives in combat": Battle Festubert, the Battle of the North Canal, the Second Battle of ipur and the Battle of munth.
They found in the event that many battles were very close to each other and many locations were in Belgium, although the country was declared a neutral zone before the war began.
Hrysko prompts students to think about what the area must look like during the chaotic and brutal times of war, the muddy, desolate crater stretches, and there are no trees or farmland on site.
The images match Google's current images of what the areas now look like, as well as lush farmland and houses.
"Think about what it takes to restore the area to its original appearance in the future.
"When they use the combat coordinates card provided to find where they are fighting, they realize the importance of being able to read the map for the soldiers.
Throughout the use of resources, students will look at trench maps, historical aerial photos and images of World War I to help them master the geographical scope of the battle and learn about trench wars.
Jared Lucassen, 15, said using maps to bring images of war into life, not just reading textbooks.
"This is a more attractive way to learn about history.
This is such a large topographic map that everyone can find something in their own separate place, "15-year-
Old ramena Singh
The time when the resource tool arrived at the school was so close to the anniversary and was also a way to help students appreciate the sacrifices made in Canada, "so that we can live here (in peace)today.
"It also helps people who have different types of learning," added Romeena . ".
"I am a tactile learner, so I learn by touching and moving.
Mariko Hamaoka said: "More" interactive learning ways "help them really understand how close the battle isMason, also 15.
"It makes it easier for us to understand.
When you talk about these places, we can see them and know where they are.
The 10 th grade Canadian history course is the only required history course that Ontario high school students must attend, "so this is an opportunity for us to interest children in history, hrysko said:" from 1914 to now, he knows the history of Canada. ".
"More than a century has passed since the beginning of World War I, and in fact, it is increasingly important for students to be educated about the sacrifices made by fellow Canadians in Europe and in Canada.
"This huge teaching tool is packed in a 2-meter-long plastic bellows that folds many times inside, just in time for the anniversary.
Launched this week by a 10 th grade Canadian history student at Robert Bateman High School, 11 m x 8 m (35ft x 26ft)
Topographic maps consume most of the space on multiple floors
Use the former dance studio at the New Street school cafeteria.
The interactive relief map and its accompanying activity backbone borrow from Canada's National Geographic magazine to show the geographical location of the battle of Canadian soldiers and the battlefield of the First World War in Europe where thousands of people died.
Before 100, the students took off their shoes and walked into the Western Line. Postcard-
Battle cards of the size of their hands-with historical photos, battle dates and number of Canadian casualties --
They were asked to find the site on the map, and as they looked around for names, they gradually found themselves gathered in a cluster in Belgium and France.
They stood at the location of the famous battles of vermi Ridge and pashrendale, where a total of more than 26,000 Canadians were killed.
Teacher Sharon Hrysko also asked them to look for less-known combat sites, "but it is also important that Canadians sacrifice their lives in combat": Battle Festubert, the Battle of the North Canal, the Second Battle of ipur and the Battle of munth.
They found in the event that many battles were very close to each other and many locations were in Belgium, although the country was declared a neutral zone before the war began.
Hrysko prompts students to think about what the area must look like during the chaotic and brutal times of war, the muddy, desolate crater stretches, and there are no trees or farmland on site.
The images match Google's current images of what the areas now look like, as well as lush farmland and houses.
"Think about what it takes to restore the area to its original appearance in the future.
"When they use the combat coordinates card provided to find where they are fighting, they realize the importance of being able to read the map for the soldiers.
Throughout the use of resources, students will look at trench maps, historical aerial photos and images of World War I to help them master the geographical scope of the battle and learn about trench wars.
Jared Lucassen, 15, said using maps to bring images of war into life, not just reading textbooks.
"This is a more attractive way to learn about history.
This is such a large topographic map that everyone can find something in their own separate place, "15-year-
Old ramena Singh
The time when the resource tool arrived at the school was so close to the anniversary and was also a way to help students appreciate the sacrifices made in Canada, "so that we can live here (in peace)today.
"It also helps people who have different types of learning," added Romeena . ".
"I am a tactile learner, so I learn by touching and moving.
Mariko Hamaoka said: "More" interactive learning ways "help them really understand how close the battle isMason, also 15.
"It makes it easier for us to understand.
When you talk about these places, we can see them and know where they are.
The 10 th grade Canadian history course is the only required history course that Ontario high school students must attend, "so this is an opportunity for us to interest children in history, hrysko said:" from 1914 to now, he knows the history of Canada. ".
"More than a century has passed since the beginning of World War I, and in fact, it is increasingly important for students to be educated about the sacrifices made by fellow Canadians in Europe and in Canada.
"This huge teaching tool is packed in a 2-meter-long plastic bellows that folds many times inside, just in time for the anniversary.
Launched this week by a 10 th grade Canadian history student at Robert Bateman High School, 11 m x 8 m (35ft x 26ft)
Topographic maps consume most of the space on multiple floors
Use the former dance studio at the New Street school cafeteria.
The interactive relief map and its accompanying activity backbone borrow from Canada's National Geographic magazine to show the geographical location of the battle of Canadian soldiers and the battlefield of the First World War in Europe where thousands of people died.
Before 100, the students took off their shoes and walked into the Western Line. Postcard-
Battle cards of the size of their hands-with historical photos, battle dates and number of Canadian casualties --
They were asked to find the site on the map, and as they looked around for names, they gradually found themselves gathered in a cluster in Belgium and France.
They stood at the location of the famous battles of vermi Ridge and pashrendale, where a total of more than 26,000 Canadians were killed.
Teacher Sharon Hrysko also asked them to look for less-known combat sites, "but it is also important that Canadians sacrifice their lives in combat": Battle Festubert, the Battle of the North Canal, the Second Battle of ipur and the Battle of munth.
They found in the event that many battles were very close to each other and many locations were in Belgium, although the country was declared a neutral zone before the war began.
Hrysko prompts students to think about what the area must look like during the chaotic and brutal times of war, the muddy, desolate crater stretches, and there are no trees or farmland on site.
The images match Google's current images of what the areas now look like, as well as lush farmland and houses.
"Think about what it takes to restore the area to its original appearance in the future.
"When they use the combat coordinates card provided to find where they are fighting, they realize the importance of being able to read the map for the soldiers.
Throughout the use of resources, students will look at trench maps, historical aerial photos and images of World War I to help them master the geographical scope of the battle and learn about trench wars.
Jared Lucassen, 15, said using maps to bring images of war into life, not just reading textbooks.
"This is a more attractive way to learn about history.
This is such a large topographic map that everyone can find something in their own separate place, "15-year-
Old ramena Singh
The time when the resource tool arrived at the school was so close to the anniversary and was also a way to help students appreciate the sacrifices made in Canada, "so that we can live here (in peace)today.
"It also helps people who have different types of learning," added Romeena . ".
"I am a tactile learner, so I learn by touching and moving.
Mariko Hamaoka said: "More" interactive learning ways "help them really understand how close the battle isMason, also 15.
"It makes it easier for us to understand.
When you talk about these places, we can see them and know where they are.
The 10 th grade Canadian history course is the only required history course that Ontario high school students must attend, "so this is an opportunity for us to interest children in history, hrysko said:" from 1914 to now, he knows the history of Canada. ".
"More than a century has passed since the beginning of World War I, and in fact, it is increasingly important for students to be educated about the sacrifices made by fellow Canadians in Europe and in Canada.
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