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guelph artist's paintings explore immigrant experience of lossguelph artist's paintings explore immigrant experience of lossguelph artist's paintings explore immigrant experience of loss - plastic sheet

by:Cailong     2019-07-24
guelph artist\'s paintings explore immigrant experience of lossguelph artist\'s paintings explore immigrant experience of lossguelph artist\'s paintings explore immigrant experience of loss  -  plastic sheet
A woman curled up in a Black Armchair.
Her knee almost touched her shoulder and her hands crossed helplessly.
The top of her head melts in the background and breaks into Brownand-
The white checkered pattern lingered behind her like a ghost.
Is her heart broken?
Or is she slowly dissolving? existence?
Maybe these are her thoughts floating on her head.
The only color in gray --
Her pink socks are childish and fragile.
Perhaps it is a symbol of her past that she is clinging to for comfort.
A woman is climbing a big gray wall.
Her knees, toes, and arms were all dug on the edge.
She is trying to lift herself up.
She may try to escape from where she is or she has almost escaped from the other side.
Or she wants to see what's behind the wall.
She is clearly stuck between two places, between the two ways of being, in her mind, in the outer world of the globe.
Because the painting is drawn on the pane of transparent plastic, the audience can see the blank left by the artist --
A woman's skirt, like a window of the heart.
Is the artist trying to tell us that we all have walls and separated spaces, not only around us, but within us?
Maybe we all have windows to escape from, we just need to find them.
The creator of these paintings, Grazyna Adamska-
Jarecka is a Polish immigrant like me.
She moved to Canada in 1996.
She holds a master's degree in painting from the Boao Forum for Asia at the University of Guelph and the Indiana University of Pennsylvania.
She has won many awards and has exhibited in individual and group performances in Canada and abroad.
We share the common experience of migration, including the loss of isolation, confusion, self and sense of place.
She portrayed these feelings in her art.
What we have in common with each other and every immigrant is that we always think about what our lives will look like if we never leave.
We all live in our memories, but especially those who have been expelled from our childhood country, grachina seems to say in her paintings, it's like a collage of thoughts or memories.
Fair Kids, toys
Story characters, house. Bright colours.
In the middle is a little girl with a bear.
Maybe it was granzina, Poland, when I was a child.
Women in Grazyna art often have her face.
Inspired by the performing arts of Marina Abramovic, Grazyna uses her body in her body to express feelings of isolation, frustration, retreat, and search for identity.
Almost life in the exhibition
The figure of a woman hovering over a transparent plastic sheet.
They seem free.
Floating in the audience
Independent, rooted, in one of their inexplicable-
Dimension depth.
Grazyna seems to ask if there is a vaccine to prevent sadness and loneliness.
In my favorite painting, a woman stands alone in a blue and melancholy space, shining a ray of blue light on her body.
Her body looks like a white, empty outline.
The only part of her life is her hand and arm until the elbow, bright yellow --orange.
She pressed the gauze on her arm as if she had just injected a dose of medicine, which allowed her to exist.
I think vaccines are art.
It speaks to everyone regardless of language, religion or politics.
It makes us react emotionally and intellectually, and it makes us feel less lonely.
Find the nest; Self-
Identity and other identities opened at the reception on April 5 and will be exhibited at the Minarovich Gallery at the Elora Arts Centre until May 13.
Kasia Jaronczyk is a writer who lives in Guelph and is also a short story collection "Lemon" (
Fairfield Publishing House, 2017).
A woman curled up in a Black Armchair.
Her knee almost touched her shoulder and her hands crossed helplessly.
The top of her head melts in the background and breaks into Brownand-
The white checkered pattern lingered behind her like a ghost.
Is her heart broken?
Or is she slowly dissolving? existence?
Maybe these are her thoughts floating on her head.
The only color in gray --
Her pink socks are childish and fragile.
Perhaps it is a symbol of her past that she is clinging to for comfort.
A woman is climbing a big gray wall.
Her knees, toes, and arms were all dug on the edge.
She is trying to lift herself up.
She may try to escape from where she is or she has almost escaped from the other side.
Or she wants to see what's behind the wall.
She is clearly stuck between two places, between the two ways of being, in her mind, in the outer world of the globe.
Because the painting is drawn on the pane of transparent plastic, the audience can see the blank left by the artist --
A woman's skirt, like a window of the heart.
Is the artist trying to tell us that we all have walls and separated spaces, not only around us, but within us?
Maybe we all have windows to escape from, we just need to find them.
The creator of these paintings, Grazyna Adamska-
Jarecka is a Polish immigrant like me.
She moved to Canada in 1996.
She holds a master's degree in painting from the Boao Forum for Asia at the University of Guelph and the Indiana University of Pennsylvania.
She has won many awards and has exhibited in individual and group performances in Canada and abroad.
We share the common experience of migration, including the loss of isolation, confusion, self and sense of place.
She portrayed these feelings in her art.
What we have in common with each other and every immigrant is that we always think about what our lives will look like if we never leave.
We all live in our memories, but especially those who have been expelled from our childhood country, grachina seems to say in her paintings, it's like a collage of thoughts or memories.
Fair Kids, toys
Story characters, house. Bright colours.
In the middle is a little girl with a bear.
Maybe it was granzina, Poland, when I was a child.
Women in Grazyna art often have her face.
Inspired by the performing arts of Marina Abramovic, Grazyna uses her body in her body to express feelings of isolation, frustration, retreat, and search for identity.
Almost life in the exhibition
The figure of a woman hovering over a transparent plastic sheet.
They seem free.
Floating in the audience
Independent, rooted, in one of their inexplicable-
Dimension depth.
Grazyna seems to ask if there is a vaccine to prevent sadness and loneliness.
In my favorite painting, a woman stands alone in a blue and melancholy space, shining a ray of blue light on her body.
Her body looks like a white, empty outline.
The only part of her life is her hand and arm until the elbow, bright yellow --orange.
She pressed the gauze on her arm as if she had just injected a dose of medicine, which allowed her to exist.
I think vaccines are art.
It speaks to everyone regardless of language, religion or politics.
It makes us react emotionally and intellectually, and it makes us feel less lonely.
Find the nest; Self-
Identity and other identities opened at the reception on April 5 and will be exhibited at the Minarovich Gallery at the Elora Arts Centre until May 13.
Kasia Jaronczyk is a writer who lives in Guelph and is also a short story collection "Lemon" (
Fairfield Publishing House, 2017).
A woman curled up in a Black Armchair.
Her knee almost touched her shoulder and her hands crossed helplessly.
The top of her head melts in the background and breaks into Brownand-
The white checkered pattern lingered behind her like a ghost.
Is her heart broken?
Or is she slowly dissolving? existence?
Maybe these are her thoughts floating on her head.
The only color in gray --
Her pink socks are childish and fragile.
Perhaps it is a symbol of her past that she is clinging to for comfort.
A woman is climbing a big gray wall.
Her knees, toes, and arms were all dug on the edge.
She is trying to lift herself up.
She may try to escape from where she is or she has almost escaped from the other side.
Or she wants to see what's behind the wall.
She is clearly stuck between two places, between the two ways of being, in her mind, in the outer world of the globe.
Because the painting is drawn on the pane of transparent plastic, the audience can see the blank left by the artist --
A woman's skirt, like a window of the heart.
Is the artist trying to tell us that we all have walls and separated spaces, not only around us, but within us?
Maybe we all have windows to escape from, we just need to find them.
The creator of these paintings, Grazyna Adamska-
Jarecka is a Polish immigrant like me.
She moved to Canada in 1996.
She holds a master's degree in painting from the Boao Forum for Asia at the University of Guelph and the Indiana University of Pennsylvania.
She has won many awards and has exhibited in individual and group performances in Canada and abroad.
We share the common experience of migration, including the loss of isolation, confusion, self and sense of place.
She portrayed these feelings in her art.
What we have in common with each other and every immigrant is that we always think about what our lives will look like if we never leave.
We all live in our memories, but especially those who have been expelled from our childhood country, grachina seems to say in her paintings, it's like a collage of thoughts or memories.
Fair Kids, toys
Story characters, house. Bright colours.
In the middle is a little girl with a bear.
Maybe it was granzina, Poland, when I was a child.
Women in Grazyna art often have her face.
Inspired by the performing arts of Marina Abramovic, Grazyna uses her body in her body to express feelings of isolation, frustration, retreat, and search for identity.
Almost life in the exhibition
The figure of a woman hovering over a transparent plastic sheet.
They seem free.
Floating in the audience
Independent, rooted, in one of their inexplicable-
Dimension depth.
Grazyna seems to ask if there is a vaccine to prevent sadness and loneliness.
In my favorite painting, a woman stands alone in a blue and melancholy space, shining a ray of blue light on her body.
Her body looks like a white, empty outline.
The only part of her life is her hand and arm until the elbow, bright yellow --orange.
She pressed the gauze on her arm as if she had just injected a dose of medicine, which allowed her to exist.
I think vaccines are art.
It speaks to everyone regardless of language, religion or politics.
It makes us react emotionally and intellectually, and it makes us feel less lonely.
Find the nest; Self-
Identity and other identities opened at the reception on April 5 and will be exhibited at the Minarovich Gallery at the Elora Arts Centre until May 13.
Kasia Jaronczyk is a writer who lives in Guelph and is also a short story collection "Lemon" (
Fairfield Publishing House, 2017).
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